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Sara Davies, Gareth Southgate & ‘broken’ recruitment


From a crucial ‘self-confidence’ tip to suggestions that recruitment is “broken”, these are the top stories making headlines this month...

In this month’s myGrapevine magazine leadership roundup, we look at what Dragon’s Den judge and MBE-awarded Sara Davies considers to be her “number one” tool for success – which may help today’s leaders on their own journey. We also look at who is more likely to return to a physical setting for work – bosses or workers – and what surprising lesson England men’s team boss Gareth Southgate had for leaders as he mulled a Euro 2020 challenge.

 

Dragons' Den judge’s “number one tool” for success

 

Dragons' Den judge’s “number one tool” for success

When it comes to business, many leaders will likely have different rules they live by to help them succeed. The same can be said for Sara Davies MBE, Founder and Owner of Crafter’s Companion, and current judge on the BBC’s Dragon’s Den. She recently shared on LinkedIn that, for her, it all comes down to self-confidence which she considers to be her “number one tool for success in business”.

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She explained to users of the professional networking site: “I make sure in every situation to ooze self-confidence so that others can feel it too. AND even if I’m not feeling totally confident I try to show it on the outside – my ‘fake it til you make it’ style (sic).” Her advice certainly provides food for thought for any leader looking to achieve their goals, as she stated that she likes to “go out there big and bold”.

The bearer of bad news

Manager of the England national team, Gareth Southgate, shone a critical light recently on the importance of being transparent when it comes to breaking bad news to staff members. This came to light after Southgate had to inform his provisional 32-man crew for the England team that some of them sadly didn’t make the cut as he had to trim it down to just 26 players – a difficult decision for even the most seasoned of football managers.

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But this carries crucial lessons for business leaders, who will likely have to deliver some bad news at some point during their career. A key way to nip this in the bud early, is to be upfront with any bad news there may be, so that employees are clear on what is happening straight away. By dealing the blow with the worst news first, staff can prepare themselves appropriately, who will also likely then appreciate their leader’s upfront honesty.

The bearer of bad news

 

Manager of the England national team, Gareth Southgate, shone a critical light recently on the importance of being transparent when it comes to breaking bad news to staff members. This came to light after Southgate had to inform his provisional 32-man crew for the England team that some of them sadly didn’t make the cut as he had to trim it down to just 26 players – a difficult decision for even the most seasoned of football managers.

But this carries crucial lessons for business leaders, who will likely have to deliver some bad news at some point during their career. A key way to nip this in the bud early, is to be upfront with any bad news there may be, so that employees are clear on what is happening straight away. By dealing the blow with the worst news first, staff can prepare themselves appropriately, who will also likely then appreciate their leader’s upfront honesty.

 

Is recruitment broken?

 

Is recruitment broken?

Throughout the pandemic, many employers chose to freeze recruitment until the crisis subsided, however for some businesses hiring had to continue. While some of these new hires may have proved beneficial, for other businesses it has been revealed that these haven’t panned out. In fact, research from talent assessment platform provider Thomas International, found that over half (57%) of all hires made in the last 12 months are not working out in some capacity.

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Sabby Gill, CEO of Thomas, noted that “recruitment is broken” adding that businesses who do not take action now will face “significant challenges as they look to accelerate hiring over the next couple of years”. It’s a worrying concept that the 2021: Mind the trust gap report uncovered, which also pointed out that the average cost of hiring a new employee can reach as much as £3,000 in the UK.

Who will be returning to work?

There’s no denying that the pandemic has allowed employees to enjoy a better work-life balance; staff can see friends and family more, a long commute no longer exists, and being glued to a desk in an office isn’t necessary. However, due to this, employees are now reluctant to return to the workplace – data from Future Forum by Slack supports this as it found that in December last year that nearly one-third of workers don’t want to ever return to the office.

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Despite this, it seems that company bosses are much more eager to return, as David Rubenstein, Managing Director of commercial real estate company Rubenstein Partners, shared in a Financial Times article: “Most CEOs are back and they want their workforce to come back.” Similarly, Ruth Colp-Haber, Founder of Wharton Property Advisors, added that CEOs are “trying to figure out how to get them (employees) back and who they can really push”. Whether or not staff will be persuaded to return remains to be seen.

Who will be returning to work?

 

There’s no denying that the pandemic has allowed employees to enjoy a better work-life balance; staff can see friends and family more, a long commute no longer exists, and being glued to a desk in an office isn’t necessary. However, due to this, employees are now reluctant to return to the workplace – data from Future Forum by Slack supports this as it found that in December last year that nearly one-third of workers don’t want to ever return to the office.

Despite this, it seems that company bosses are much more eager to return, as David Rubenstein, Manging Director of commercial real estate company Rubenstein Partners, shared in a Financial Times article: “Most CEOs are back and they want their workforce to come back.” Similarly, Ruth Colp-Haber, Founder of Wharton Property Advisors, added that CEOs are “trying to figure out how to get them (employees) back and who they can really push”. Whether or not staff will be persuaded to return remains to be seen.

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