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‘The Great Resignation’, ‘oversharing’ on video calls & the four-day work week


With some business leaders thinking they have found a way to fix talent woes and others warning of the power that workers have in the talent market, myGrapevine magazine looks at the most pressing leadership trends...

 

In this month’s myGrapevine magazine leadership roundup, we look at what one leader thinks could help fix the ‘talent crisis’, why one CEO is warning of employee power in ‘The Great Resignation’, and explore whether leaders are oversharing on video calls.

 

Leaders warned of employee power in ‘The Great Resignation’

 

Leaders warned of employee power in ‘The Great Resignation’

More and more companies have been talking about what has been coined ‘The Great Resignation’ – a term used to describe a mass migration of workers away from their current employer.

In an interview with Axios, Deloitte’s US CEO, Joe Ucuzoglu, said: “The Great Resignation is really an appropriate descriptor.”

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The CEO noted that the general feeling of mass career change has been ‘simmering’ among workforces over the past year, and has combined a greater need for talent in the world of work.

"This is the hottest talent market that most of us have ever seen. In this type of market, workers have a lot of leverage," he added.

And it seems that his is thinking is not apropos of nothing though. For example, a recent Monster study concluded that 95% of workers were considering quitting their jobs in the next 12 months.

Leader thinks four-day week could be the fix to talent woes

In the last few weeks and months, many businesses have been facing a talent crisis, which has largely been attributed to things such as increased turnover, lower demand for roles and burnout.

Yet, one business leader thinks he has found a solution to the widespread talent woes experienced by many employers.

For Joe Munns, CEO and Founder of Bakedin the answer has been to reduce the working week down to four days – a concept that several companies and countries have trialled.

In a recent interview with the BBC, he explained that a big advantage of a four-day week for the owners of start-ups is that it is a huge selling point when looking to attract new talent, as well as helping to reduce turnover levels.

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He told the BBC: "When you're starting a business, when you can't necessarily pay the high salaries that the bigger companies do, being able to dictate the working hours is something that you have completely in your control.

"Every year, some 30% of employees in the food industry leave their jobs. But at Bakedin, our staff turnover rate is under five per cent. So, a four-day week is an excellent way of retaining staff and keeping them.”

Leader thinks four-day week could be the fix to talent woes

 

In the last few weeks and months, many businesses have been facing a talent crisis, which has largely been attributed to things such as increased turnover, lower demand for roles and burnout.

Yet, one business leader thinks he has found a solution to the widespread talent woes experienced by many employers.

For Joe Munns, CEO and Founder of Bakedin the answer has been to reduce the working week down to four days – a concept that several companies and countries have trialled.

In a recent interview with the BBC, he explained that a big advantage of a four-day week for the owners of start-ups is that it is a huge selling point when looking to attract new talent, as well as helping to reduce turnover levels.

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He told the BBC: "When you're starting a business, when you can't necessarily pay the high salaries that the bigger companies do, being able to dictate the working hours is something that you have completely in your control.

"Every year, some 30% of employees in the food industry leave their jobs. But at Bakedin, our staff turnover rate is under five per cent. So, a four-day week is an excellent way of retaining staff and keeping them.”

 

Rishi Sunak’s warning to young people on remote working – is he right?

 

Rishi Sunak’s warning to young people on remote working – is he right?

Many businesses are currently weighing up the future structures of work – whether this centres around returning to the office, enabling long-term homeworking, or pivoting to a hybrid model.

As some may look to continue some form of homeworking, Chancellor Rishi Sunak has shared fears that young people’s opportunities for career progression could be impacted by remote working.

In an interview with LinkedIn News, Sunak said that being in an office environment at the beginning of his career was “really beneficial”, which is something that leaders need to be aware of.

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He also said that this provided him with access to mentorship and guidance that he may not have had if he had been working remotely.

He previously told the Daily Telegraph that it was “really important” for young people to be in a physical work environment, and said he was looking forward to “slowly getting back to that”.

Are leaders oversharing on work video calls?

In the last 18 months, employees and bosses have adapted to digital-first ways of working. This has seen many rely on video calls to communicate with one another from their home offices or kitchen tables.

But, has this led to professionals spilling too much about their personal life?

Following an opinion piece in The Age – in which consultant Jim Bright said that oversharing was “far too easy in the Zoom era” – a post on LinkedIn asked users to weigh in on whether workers were getting too personal on remote calls.

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The LinkedIn post said: “Do you or your co-workers overshare during work video calls?”

“Eating meals on camera, not blurring the backdrop of your messy bedroom or taking colleagues to the kitchen to make a mid-meeting cuppa are signs workers are inviting others into their private life without consideration, says career consultant Jim Bright,” the post continued.

In response to a poll titled ‘Is it OK for co-workers to overshare on video calls’, 21% felt that oversharing was acceptable, while 43% said “no, it’s uncomfortable” (at the time of writing).

Are leaders oversharing on work video calls?

 

In the last 18 months, employees and bosses have adapted to digital-first ways of working. This has seen many rely on video calls to communicate with one another from their home offices or kitchen tables.

But, has this led to professionals spilling too much about their personal life?

Following an opinion piece in The Age – in which consultant Jim Bright said that oversharing was “far too easy in the Zoom era” – a post on LinkedIn asked users to weigh in on whether workers were getting too personal on remote calls.

The LinkedIn post said: “Do you or your co-workers overshare during work video calls?”

“Eating meals on camera, not blurring the backdrop of your messy bedroom or taking colleagues to the kitchen to make a mid-meeting cuppa are signs workers are inviting others into their private life without consideration, says career consultant Jim Bright,” the post continued.

In response to a poll titled ‘Is it OK for co-workers to overshare on video calls’, 21% felt that oversharing was acceptable, while 43% said “no, it’s uncomfortable” (at the time of writing).

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