Performance enabled by technology, driven by process, powered by people


Danny Seals

Director of Design & Experience

 
Read more about Danny

Combining technology with the human experience

It’s hard to imagine going to work and not using some form of technology to aid us in our day-to-day tasks. It’s become engrained in most organisational cultures, and has immeasurable benefits. Technology can help us work smarter – but only if used correctly.

Before we establish how technologies can enable performance, we firstly need to assess what people want from technology. Using technology for technology’s sake is not only ineffective, but can be costly too. What is it that teams need in order to perform productively? What are the current problems they are facing?

 

To answer these questions, you need a centralised space to communicate. As humans, it’s in our very nature to collaborate, to share stories. Technology enables us to do this virtually on a wider scale. Whether that’s using platforms such as Slack or Skype, we utilise centralised hubs via technology to connect and continue this interactivity.

You then need to determine whether you are using technology to its maximum potential, or alternatively, whether the technology you have already implemented provides the same user experiences you have in your personal lives.

We can easily order an Uber or purchase a meal in just a few clicks, so why can’t the tech we use at work be just as simple? Once organisations have figured out how to overcome this, they then need to make the processes of using that technology seamless and invisible.

Let’s look at Microsoft Teams (MT). In response to Covid-19, this platform became important for the communication and collaboration of different groups. This isn’t to say the platform only succeeded because of Covid-19, but it definitely enabled the transformation to happen a lot quicker. MT instantly eased the transition from office working to virtual working with its various tools and functions. Although it’s not entirely invisible, many were already working in the platform, so they didn’t see it as learning another process or modality. It simply enabled their day-to-day task in the flow of work.

Once the transition to consume technologies such as MT becomes seamless, the process of using it then boils down to two simple steps: The motivation to use it, and the ability to use it effortlessly.

 

People have a motivation to succeed in their job, but this motivation comes in waves. Therefore, the ability to do your job needs to be easy when motivation is low. To achieve this, we use frictionless technology that allows us to perform a task within a few clicks as opposed to many. In effect, this eases processes and makes the entire human experience more agreeable.

By reaching these touchpoints, technology can develop people’s capabilities, which will inevitably enable performance. But the trick is to use it in the right way. So, how are you using technology to power your people and maximise performance?

 
 

Want help understanding your people’s pain points, or need support in selecting the right tech for your learning communities? Contact us today on +44 (0)8085 734734 to speak to one of our learning experts.

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