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What’s trending?

'Quiet firing', unlimited PTO & recruiting via TikTok


With multiple employers adding unlimited paid time off (PTO) to their list of benefits, we take a look at how HR can get this right – by getting the right leadership, culture and technology in place. We have also delved into the latest catchphrase, ‘quiet firing’ and whether that’s helping or hindering HR. Lastly, we review hiring via social media platform TikTok and how it could help HR attract talented Generation Z (Gen Z) workers...

 
 

Could using TikTok help HR attract Gen Z into work?

 

Could using TikTok help HR attract Gen Z into work?

Wildly popular video-sharing platform TikTok is the latest user-generated social media site, where users can create singing, dancing and comedy reels. With one billion users as of September 2021 (reported on by CNBC), TikTok is no longer just a fad. And recently, its presence appears to be making its way into the world of work – with job site Indeed announcing a partnership with the platform.

If employers want to attract and recruit the best possible talent, TikTok could be yet another tool in HR’s toolkit. Bhanu Dir, Managing Director at training provider firm Steps to Work, previously told HR Grapevine that job-searching tactics are evolving in the current landscape. “With this in mind, social media is now a powerful way for companies to reach the younger generation,” he said.

 

“TikTok, which is one of the fastest-growing social media platforms in the world, is now a great way for businesses to attract younger generations as it’s engaging, interesting, and authentic. This is because young people today prefer to do and see things ‘on the go’ and want something that grabs their attention in a creative way.”

As such, Dir said that by solely posting adverts on job boards – and not exploring social media platforms like TikTok – employers could run the risk of missing out on top talent from this demographic.

Experts have suggested that employers could use TikTok to advertise job vacancies, create videos to convey important parts of the job, and give talent a glimpse of the company’s culture.

How to do unlimited PTO right – with insights from Dropbox

2022 data from flexible office and workspace provider IWG found that unlimited holiday was an important factor for 76% of jobseekers. Companies including Bumble and, more recently, EatSleepMedia, have been taking note of this growing appetite by implementing unlimited paid time off policies.

On this topic, Laura Ryan, Director of International HR at Dropbox, previously told HR Grapevine that it is “essential that organisations iron out the issues that are already preventing employees from taking the time they need to unwind.

 

“This is why it’s important to have the right guide rails in an environment that supports taking leave without guilt. This can be done by tackling leadership, culture and technology,” she added.

Leaders must lead by example and make it obvious to staff that they are taking the holiday time that they need, explained Ryan. If they do this correctly, then staff will feel comfortable and guilt-free doing the same.

“Implementing the right technology can help employees experience the end of presenteeism, in favour of flexibility and actual results. For Dropbox, this meant implementing several initiatives to support employees in stepping away from technology when they need to disconnect, including ‘unplugged’ time off,” she concluded.

How to do unlimited PTO right – with insights from Dropbox

 

2022 data from flexible office and workspace provider IWG found that unlimited holiday was an important factor for 76% of jobseekers. Companies including Bumble and, more recently, EatSleepMedia, have been taking note of this growing appetite by implementing unlimited paid time off policies.

On this topic, Laura Ryan, Director of International HR at Dropbox, told HR Grapevine that it is “essential that organisations iron out the issues that are already preventing employees from taking the time they need to unwind”.

 

“This is why it’s important to have the right guide rails in an environment that supports taking leave without guilt. This can be done by tackling leadership, culture and technology,” she added.

Leaders must lead by example and make it obvious to staff that they are taking the holiday time that they need, explained Ryan. If they do this correctly, then staff will feel comfortable and guilt-free ding the same.

“Implementing the right technology can help employees experience the end of presenteeism, in favour of flexibility and actual results. For Dropbox, this meant implementing several initiatives to support employees in stepping away from technology when they need to disconnect, including ‘unplugged’ time off,” she concluded.

 
 

HR's latest catchphrase is ‘quiet firing’ – what is it?

 

HR's latest catchphrase is ‘quiet firing’ – what is it?

‘Quiet quitting’ has been an incredibly popular term hitting headlines in recent weeks. According to TikTok user @zkchillin, this occurs when someone isn’t “outright quitting your job, but you’re quitting the idea of going above and beyond”. However, LinkedIn has now hit back with an opposite catchphrase called ‘quiet firing’.

This is essentially the act of bosses who don’t sack employees, but take steps instead to make them feel unappreciated, as well as restricting career opportunities, to the point that they eventually leave of their own accord. The thinking behind it is that ‘quiet firing’ will allow firms to save money and time by not investing in career development plans or offering pay rises, among other things.

 

In a LinkedIn post, Bonnie Dilber, Recruiting Manager at workflow automation firm Zapier, addressed the many columns dedicated to ‘quiet quitting’ in recent weeks, writing on the social networking site: “The ‘quiet quitting’ thing is funny to me. I think the real conversation should be around ‘quiet firing’ as it's rampant.

“You don't receive feedback or praise. You get raises of three per cent or less while others are getting much more. Your 1:1s are frequently cancelled or shuffled around. You don't get invited to work on cool projects or stretch opportunities.”

She continued: “Instead of worrying about ‘quiet quitting’, I'd encourage companies to look at their management practices and identify places where people are being ‘quiet fired’ by poor managers who don't want to do the work to support, train, and coach their teams.”

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