#MeToo | Does HR actually help victims of harassment?

Does HR actually help victims of harassment?

Spearheaded by the #MeToo movement, the past few years have born witness to a vocal uprising in the workplace.

Historically, fear of detrimental consequences, being fired or treated poorly dominated the balance of power in situations relating to workplace harassment. However, the revolutionary actions of individuals who were no longer prepared to endure the physical and mental damage inflicted by powerful figures such as Harvey Weinstein, Philip Green and Les Moonves, demonstrated a seachange in the conversation surrounding abuse that made it almost impossible for such individuals to continue to rely on their professional clout to hide their actions.

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Comments (1)

  • Anna
    Anna
    Mon, 24 Jun 2019 12:19pm BST
    In my experience, no. HR is more concerned with protecting the company and its executives than its employees. I've been in a situation where I've been screwed over by HR in relation to inappropriate action by an exec. It didn't feel worth the stress to try and take them on, so I took the redundancy they offered me and got out of there.

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