Mental health | Women more stressed than men at work

Women more stressed than men at work

New research has revealed that women feel more stressed than men at work – with one in 10 feeling like their stress levels are unmanageable.

According to Cigna, whose research was taken from the Cigna 360 Wellbeing Survey, heavy workloads, personal health and the financial concerns are the top stress triggers for UK women.

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Comments (2)

  • JBP
    JBP
    Tue, 26 Mar 2019 1:18pm GMT
    It's because women are more prone to trait neuroticism than men. This is empirically demonstrated; you can find the data very easily.
  • Sir
    Sir
    Tue, 26 Mar 2019 1:03pm GMT
    Often I lie awake at night wondering if I am going to read an article at any point in the next 12-18 months which doesn't cite 'flexible working' as the solution to almost any organisational ill.
    Are 'zero hours' contracts a form of flexible working ?
    ....... or is this muddling too many trains of thought together at once ?