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What’s trending?

‘Quiet quitting’, recruiting degree-holders & John Lewis chief


In this month’s myGrapevine magazine HR round up, we take a look at the growing trend that is ‘quiet quitting’. Elsewhere, we take a look at comments made by Dame Sharon White, Chairwoman of John Lewis, about the impact that retirees have had on the UK’s labour market. We also delve into a recent report from the CIPD which found that firms could be contributing to labour shortages and skills gaps by prioritising degree-holders during the recruitment process.

 
 

‘Quiet quitting’: What is it and how can HR prevent it?

 

‘Quiet quitting’: What is it and how can HR prevent it?

‘Quiet quitting’ is the latest “trend” to hit the world of work. “You’re not outright quitting your job, but you’re quitting the idea of going above and beyond. You’re still performing your duties, but you’re no longer subscribing to the hustle culture mentality that work has to be your life – the reality is, it’s not,” Tik Tok user @zkchillin explained in a recent video.

Tom Cornell, Senior Psychology Consultant at HireVue, told HR Grapevine that “this is not a group of employees who are truly underperforming or not doing work at all”. He said: “Instead, it’s employees who are not engaged or motivated by their job to do more than is required. And it’s the employer's role to ensure processes are in place that encourage a well-balanced working culture and inspire employees to go above and beyond in their roles.”

 

Given the impact that this could have on staff and the business, how can HR prevent it? Several experts explained that regular communication between line managers and direct reports, promoting transparency around clear career progression, and having a good rewards and recognition programme, can help to prevent ‘quiet quitting’. If employees are valued, and feel that their needs are being met, they are more likely to feel motivated and engaged to go above and beyond.

John Lewis boss urges retirees to go back to work to help the economy

The pandemic saw many older workers seize the opportunity of early retirement, but with talent shortages still blighting the country, calls continue to grow for many of them to return to work to help plug the skills gaps.

The latest call has come from John Lewis Chairwoman, Dame Sharon White, who said that over-50s who have retired recently have shrunk the UK labour market and driven up inflation.

 

Speaking recently on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Dame Sharon discussed the exodus that has seen around a million people leave the working population since the pandemic began, contributing to an increase in inflation and wage growth.

Fewer employees in work means businesses are facing pressure to raise salaries, which in turn is pushing up prices. It is also having major long-term implications for businesses struggling to fill jobs, Dame Sharon added.

So what’s the solution? In Dame Sharon’s opinion, early retirees could be enticed back into the workplace with flexible working options, in a bid to plug the huge talent crisis facing the country.

John Lewis boss urges retirees to go back to work to help the economy

 

The pandemic saw many older workers seize the opportunity of early retirement, but with talent shortages still blighting the country, calls continue to grow for many of them to return to work to help plug the skills gaps.

The latest call has come from John Lewis Chairwoman, Dame Sharon White, who said that over-50s who have retired recently have shrunk the UK labour market and driven up inflation.

 

Speaking recently on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Dame Sharon discussed the exodus that has seen around a million people leave the working population since the pandemic began, contributing to an increase in inflation and wage growth.

Fewer employees in work means businesses are facing pressure to raise salaries, which in turn is pushing up prices. It is also having major long-term implications for businesses struggling to fill jobs, Dame Sharon added.

So what’s the solution? In Dame Sharon’s opinion, early retirees could be enticed back into the workplace with flexible working options, in a bid to plug the huge talent crisis facing the country.

 
 

Still looking for candidates with degrees? You might be causing skills gaps

 

Still looking for candidates with degrees? You might be causing skills gaps

Employers have been urged to stop prioritising candidates with degree qualifications when screening job applicants, with experts warning that the practise could be contributing to skills gaps and reducing employment opportunities.

Recent research from the CIPD, the professional body for HR and people development, revealed that the majority of employers (57%) still mainly look for degrees or post-graduate qualifications when recruiting staff.

Whilst a degree is a requirement for certain occupations and roles, the CIPD is warning that, too often, employers base hiring decisions on whether someone has a degree or not, regardless of its relevance. By doing this, the CIPD said employers could be missing out on key talent, exacerbating skills gaps and reducing employment opportunities for people.

 

Lizzie Crowley, Skills Adviser for the CIPD, said: “Employers need to stop thinking that generic university degrees are always the best indicator of a person’s potential at work. They think they’re getting ‘off the shelf’ capability rather than assessing the specific skills needed for roles, then wondering why they have ongoing skills gaps.

“More employers need to take a strategic approach to skills to understand current and future needs. This means valuing a wider range of experience and qualifications when recruiting for roles and understanding all of the training and development options available to employers to upskill existing staff,” Crowley added.

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