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Susan Hilliar

Head of International Communications


 

The evolving candidate experience


 

Susan Hilliar

Head of International Communications



 

Susan Hilliar

Head of International Communications


The new digital world has seen traditional Human Resources (HR) undergo quite the digital transformation. It seems strange then, that the CV continues to remain the primary hiring tool.

There are several arguments as to why the CV is no longer adequate. While it’s true that they give an overview of the individual’s education, work experience and career history – they give no true indication as to how the individual will actually perform in a given role.

 

The Covid-19 pandemic served to highlight how important emotional intelligence and soft skills are in the modern working world. Employers need to know how well a candidate will adapt to the dynamic technological landscape, as well as how they collaborate with colleagues and react to situations. To address this, companies such as Facebook and Google are using personality tests, as a means to assess an individual’s soft or “human” skills. Tests such as the Myers Briggs Test can give employers insights into the individual’s personality type.

Whilst these tests may seem to help to create a more rounded picture of the candidate, they are by no means a perfect solution. In fact, a study by ResearchGate found that the same person taking the test twice within five weeks will get completely different results 50% of the time.

All this shows that hiring practises are still far from perfect. However, it’s vital for organisations to not focus solely on how candidate presents themselves. How an organisation presents itself to candidates is also a crucial part of the recruitment process. This boils down to creating a good candidate experience. Whether organisations use CVs, personality tests, or both – if the candidate experience is bad, recruitment will be negatively impacted.

 
 

Organisations need to ensure their candidate experience is seamless, intuitive and simple. For example, businesses could provide a single portal for candidates to manage their job submissions, share job openings, and stay in the know for future opportunities. By reducing complexity for candidates, organisations will gain a reputation as a company that cares from the moment an application is submitted. This, in turn, will make them appear more attractive to potential talent, thereby increasing the number of applicants.

As hiring tools continue to evolve, organisations should not become complacent about their role in the recruitment process. Candidates will continue to try and present their best selves, and organisations must strive to do the same.

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