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What’s trending?

Bosses firing people over social media, World Mental Health Day & how TikTok is helping with salary transparency


In this month’s trending topics, we’ve gone in-depth about employee social media use and when it’s acceptable to take legal action. In addition, Ricoh UK shares its insights into ‘unseen challenges’ and how to help with mental health issues at work. And lastly, did you know that TikTok can help keep companies honest on salary? We did, and we’ve got the scoop.

 
 

‘Creepy boss' post gets worker wrongly sacked - should HR police social media?

 

‘Creepy boss' post gets worker wrongly sacked - should HR police social media?

A tribunal found recently that a worker was owed compensation when she was sacked for sharing a Facebook post that a former colleague had written, which described boss Himesh Patel as inappropriate toward female customers.

The tribunal found that the employee, Dimaris Trench, was dismissed unfairly, stating that the punishment was too severe, and that Trench had been dismissed without a proper investigation or right to appeal. In the concluding statements to the tribunal, after which Ms Trench was awarded £3,000 in lost wages from Lincolnshire pub Trebles, the judges said, “She took the Facebook post down very quickly and apologised for it. She did not write the post and was not acting vindictively or deliberately to damage the [bar’s] interests. She made a mistake, for which she paid.”

 

This raises yet again, the perennial questions of a) whether bosses should be spying on or policing employees’ social media, and b), if there are posts about work, how they should be handled. Certainly, based on the result of this tribunal, it would seem that cursory dismissal is most likely not the best way to handle it – with the big exception being posts that contravene the Equality Act 2010, or show serious antisocial behaviour.

Can TikTok transform the grey area of pay?

Salary transparency is the proverbial talk of the town in the world of work, no matter what ‘town’ one is in. In fact, research from jobseeker site Adzuna has shown that it’s top priority for candidates in any job posting.

 

The survey found that 69% of Brits polled think that organisations need to be more transparent on their job adverts, with 48% saying that lack of salary on a job advert is their number one turn-off or irritant when job seeking.

And a full 31% said that that salary transparency should be the top priority for HR and managers when crafting job posts.

Further than just being desirable for candidates, it’s actually proving to be a blocker for hiring the best talent – Adzuna’s poll showed that candidates believed companies posting jobs without the salary band are: untrustworthy, would underpay employees, are hiding something, and are unprofessional. The hits just keep coming!

Adzuna has called on employers to include salaries in job adverts. The organisation is also campaigning for the UK Government to make adding salaries onto job adverts a legal requirement.

Clive Smart, Head of Talent Acquisition at Sky Betting & Gaming, which decided this year to always include salary band on all job adverts, said: “It’s hard enough in this game trying to hire people at the moment anyway and you make it so much harder by hiding that [salary] information from candidates.”

Can TikTok transform the grey area of pay?

 

The survey found that 69% of Brits polled think that organisations need to be more transparent on their job adverts, with 48% saying that lack of salary on a job advert is their number one turn-off or irritant when job seeking.

 

And a full 31% said that that salary transparency should be the top priority for HR and managers when crafting job posts.

Further than just being desirable for candidates, it’s actually proving to be a blocker for hiring the best talent – Adzuna’s poll showed that candidates believed companies posting jobs without the salary band are: untrustworthy, would underpay employees, are hiding something, and are unprofessional. The hits just keep coming!

Adzuna has called on employers to include salaries in job adverts, the organisation is also campaigning for the UK Government to make adding salaries onto job adverts a legal requirement.

Clive Smart, Head of Talent Acquisition at Sky Betting & Gaming, which decided this year to always include salary band on all job adverts, said: “It’s hard enough in this game trying to hire people at the moment anyway and you make it so much harder by hiding that [salary] information from candidates.”

 
 

What HR should be thinking about this World Mental Health Day

 

What HR should be thinking about this World Mental Health Day

Mental health has become a big buzz phrase in recent years. You may have noticed that last month, on October 10th, that a lot of your friends and family and organisations you follow, were posting on social media about mental health. And while it’s important to have a day that celebrates transparency and sensitivity about the mental health issues we all may face at some point, it’s also helping raise awareness every day of the year.

Printing and office supplies company Ricoh UK shared its insights with HR Grapevine, giving tips on how to observe this day at work, from Rebekah Wallis, Director of People & Corporate Responsibility and Marco Pezzani, National Customer Service Director.

 

“It’s more important than ever to take a step back from the day-to-day and consider the bigger picture,” shares Wallis. “An organisation is only as strong as its people, all of whom have their own stories, difficulties, and strengths.”

She continues: “For employers it’s important to understand that dealing with mental health can be a long road and there often isn’t an immediate fix. Accepting this and taking a long-term view by providing support through implementing initiatives focused on wellbeing and mental health can help to open up conversations and remove stigma.”

Pezzani weighs in, saying: “By fostering an environment of support, you can ensure your business isn’t negatively impacting anyone’s mental wellbeing. While this can feel like an intimidating task there are simple, practical steps which can be taken: Set clear boundaries around work/life balance, have check-ins with your teams and proactively reach out to anyone in your team who you feel may seem a little off.”

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