3
/15

We Ask the Experts

How can HR improve talent management in 2022?

Burberry Fujitsu MHR Westfield Health

Now that we are firmly in the final quarter of 2021, HR practitioners might well be reflecting on the past year and thinking about what the function can do to make improvements to their existing practices for 2022. One of the key areas of focus – particularly at a time where employers are struggling to find the right hires and skills, and hold on to their existing workforce – is talent management.

Statistics point towards some of these difficulties. Data from the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC) – reported on by the Independent – found that more than two-thirds of UK employers are trying to hire new workers but are definitely struggling to find new recruits. Elsewhere, data published in Totaljobs’ Hiring Trends Index has found that 29% of UK employers expect skills shortages to impact their success in the final quarter of this year – something which could impact well into 2022.

And with the pandemic sparking a move to more flexible working structures, other research has found that employees would vote with their feet if their demands are not met. For example, EY’s 2021 Work Reimagined Employee Survey found that more than half (54%) of global employees surveyed would quit their jobs if not given flexibility after the pandemic – suggesting that HR needs to consider how to retain staff and provide a great employee experience.

This is why in this month’s burning HR question, myGrapevine magazine asked its expert panel how the people function can endeavour to improve talent management next year.

Their advice is below.

Amir Kabel,
Global Head of Diversity and Inclusion,
Burberry

“HR can improve talent management by being agile. Like knowing their customers, companies need to further understand their employees. Creating an off-the-shelf product or one-size fits-all-programme will not take into account the diversity of talent, who will have different needs and development plans to thrive as leaders.

“Diverse leader’s journeys at the company will be different and companies need to accept this. Providing a nuanced approach is key to give leaders the right experience; same as you would for your customers or clients. Also, remember talent management is a whole suite of programmes and approach, so everything under this function should have a lens of inclusion and agility.”

70% of jobseekers value a commitment to diversity in potential employers – TheManifest

70% of jobseekers value a commitment to diversity in potential employers – TheManifest

Amir Kabel,
Global Head of Diversity and Inclusion,
Burberry

“HR can improve talent management by being agile. Like knowing their customers, companies need to further understand their employees. Creating an off-the-shelf product or one-size fits-all-programme will not take into account the diversity of talent, who will have different needs and development plans to thrive as leaders.

“Diverse leader’s journeys at the company will be different and companies need to accept this. Providing a nuanced approach is key to give leaders the right experience; same as you would for your customers or clients. Also, remember talent management is a whole suite of programmes and approaches, so everything under this function should have a lens of inclusion and agility.”

Staff said they would leave their current role to find an organisation with a higher purpose or stronger mission (12%) – OfficeTeam

Jason Fowler,
VP, HR Director,
Fujitsu

“Today, the question is not only how to attract new talent, but how to hold onto the talent you already have. Employers need to think carefully about what their ‘offer’ is to a talent market that is full of choice. This is about more than salary and benefits alone. Instead, it’s the whole employee experience, including working environments (physical and digital), how and where work gets done, company ethos, culture and increasingly, the social and environmental impact of an organisation.

“Specifically, social and environmental impact is a topic that increasingly plays a role in how attractive an organisation is as a prospective employer – and whether the stated claims are authentic and meaningful enough. Providing clarity and a credible means of being able to effectively integrate professional and personal priorities – with neither being compromised – is a major factor when deciding on a role change.

“What’s more, as we exit pandemic-related restrictions, many employers have been formulating their version of hybrid working practices. Those that have turned these into specific policies stand to gain competitive advantage when it comes to attracting talent. Employees are rethinking their own expectations of work and life and the key factor is that employers recognise that it is the talent, and not the recruiter, that has the choice today. In any market, those organisations that put most effort and attention into responding to this and shaping a compelling offer will set themselves apart.”

Staff said they would leave their current role to find an organisation with a higher purpose or stronger mission (12%) – OfficeTeam

Jason Fowler,
VP, HR Director,
Fujitsu

“Today, the question is not only how to attract new talent, but how to hold onto the talent you already have. Employers need to think carefully about what their ‘offer’ is to a talent market that is full of choice. This is about more than salary and benefits alone. Instead, it’s the whole employee experience, including working environments (physical and digital), how and where work gets done, company ethos, culture and increasingly, the social and environmental impact of an organisation.

“Specifically, social and environmental impact is a topic that increasingly plays a role in how attractive an organisation is as a prospective employer – and whether the stated claims are authentic and meaningful enough. Providing clarity and a credible means of being able to effectively integrate professional and personal priorities – with neither being compromised – is a major factor when deciding on a role change.

“What’s more, as we exit pandemic-related restrictions, many employers have been formulating their version of hybrid working practices. Those that have turned these into specific policies stand to gain competitive advantage when it comes to attracting talent. Employees are rethinking their own expectations of work and life and the key factor is that employers recognise that it is the talent, and not the recruiter, that has the choice today. In any market, those organisations that put most effort and attention into responding to this and shaping a compelling offer will set themselves apart.”

Jeanette Wheeler,
HR Director,
MHR International

“The current skills shortages should prompt organisations to implement a ‘grow your own’ strategy. It’s time to go back to creating in-house learning centres and academies to attract, train and upskill younger employees in addition to upskilling and providing new opportunities for current employees.

“One of the most vital elements in growing your own is mapping talent – having the capability to understand and collate the talents and skills of an existing workforce and plan for employees future training and development requirements.

“HR departments and line managers need to take the initiative and build a picture of employees and their skillsets through regular check-ins. They should use their HR systems so people can share or discuss individuals’ skills and interests that organisations can utilise and employees can enhance.

“Businesses need a map of their employees’ talents, using competency frameworks to match skills to job roles. This talent mapping should begin as soon as new employees arrive and HR should work with managers and employees to build a clear view of what each employee wants to achieve while working at the organisation.”

29% of UK firms expect skills shortages to impact their success in Q4 of 2021 – Totaljobs Hiring Trends Index

29% of UK firms expect skills shortages to impact their success in Q4 of 2021 – Totaljobs Hiring Trends Index

Jeanette Wheeler,
HR Director,
MHR International

“The current skills shortages should prompt organisations to implement a ‘grow your own’ strategy. It’s time to go back to creating in-house learning centres and academies to attract, train and upskill younger employees in addition to upskilling and providing new opportunities for current employees.

“One of the most vital elements in growing your own is mapping talent – having the capability to understand and collate the talents and skills of an existing workforce and plan for employees future training and development requirements.

“HR departments and line managers need to take the initiative and build a picture of employees and their skillsets through regular check-ins. They should use their HR systems so people can share or discuss individuals’ skills and interests that organisations can utilise and employees can enhance.

“Businesses need a map of their employees’ talents, using competency frameworks to match skills to job roles. This talent mapping should begin as soon as new employees arrive and HR should work with managers and employees to build a clear view of what each employee wants to achieve while working at the organisation.”

Adaptability, collaboration & creativity were among some of the most in-demand soft skills – LinkedIn Learning’s The Skills Companies Need Most in 2020.

Andrea Smith,
HR Director, Transformation UK&I,
Coty

“Understanding what are the most in-demand hard and soft skills for organisations in 2022 and attracting talent in these areas is the starting point to improving talent management. Soft skills in character traits or interpersonal skills are typically more difficult to evaluate, but essential to gain a good measure of talent. A strengths-based approach to managing talent focuses on positive attributes and building on it. Strengths-based practices cultivates a nurturing environment and works best with individuals to also promote their wellbeing.

“Reverse mentoring schemes and partnering employees from different generations is a great way to encourage fresh perspectives and inspires individuals to do more than just their day job. Pairing people from diverse backgrounds also encourages diversity and inclusion that builds a culture of recognising talent through different forums.”

Adaptability, collaboration & creativity were among some of the most in-demand soft skills – LinkedIn Learning’s The Skills Companies Need Most in 2020.

Andrea Smith,
HR Director, Transformation UK&I,
Coty

“Understanding what are the most in-demand hard and soft skills for organisations in 2022 and attracting talent in these areas is the starting point to improving talent management. Soft skills in character traits or interpersonal skills are typically more difficult to evaluate, but essential to gain a good measure of talent. A strengths-based approach to managing talent focuses on positive attributes and building on it. Strengths-based practices cultivates a nurturing environment and works best with individuals to also promote their wellbeing.

“Reverse mentoring schemes and partnering employees from different generations is a great way to encourage fresh perspectives and inspires individuals to do more than just their day job. Pairing people from diverse backgrounds also encourages diversity and inclusion that builds a culture of recognising talent through different forums.”

You are currently previewing this article.

This is the last preview available to you for the next 30 days.

To access more news, features, columns and opinions every day, create a free myGrapevine account.