How to create and sustain a resilient and healthy working culture

Work culture is about mental and physical health, short and long-term.
HR Grapevine
HR Grapevine | Executive Grapevine International Ltd
How to create and sustain a resilient and healthy working culture

Building and sustaining a resilient and healthy working culture is not only fundamental for the success of an organisation, but is also a key pillar when it comes to employee wellbeing. The dynamics of work are continually evolving, so offering a workplace (both in-person and remotely or virtually) that prioritises resilience, health and a positive atmosphere should be high up on your agenda. After all, it's arguable that the culture of an organisation shapes its identity, influences employee satisfaction and ultimately determines its ability to adapt to change.

According to Westfield Health's 2024 Wellbeing Trends Report, almost half (47%) of UK workers say the pandemic has reduced the importance they place on work, with 42% of workers saying they've never been asked to input on what wellbeing support they recieve.

Vicky Walker, Group Director of People at Westfield Health, says: “As we enter 2024, employees are more engaged with their health than ever — and their own unique needs. This could include anything from managing on-going health conditions to coping with a bereavement or fitting work around their childcare hours. Rather than blanket changes to workplace policies, HR will need to help support their people’s individual sense of wellbeing. Our new 2024 Wellbeing Trends Report from Westfield Health has highlighted some major shifts in the workplace.

As NHS wait times are at an all-time high, there’s an increase in people relying on other sources of support, especially when it comes to mental health. This might include online therapy or telephone GP services — often at a cost to the individual. In 2024, I hope that more employers seek ways to provide this much-needed support and make it accessible to their people."

It can be easy to see culture as a physcial thing - for example, there has been a recent trend of 'envy offices', essentially referring to offices that businesses have tried to make aesthetically pleasing, in an attempt to coax staff back to the office from home. These offices usually have ‘hang out’ areas, replete with ping pong tables, and oddly-shaped and uncomfortable looking colourful chairs and sofas.

Positive culture is built on trust

Culture can be seen, perhaps, as the 'feels' - how happy people are. But it's beyond that - it is also about more deep-rooted ethics and policy. Indeed, the term organisational culture has transformed from something perceived as a “fluffy” and poorly understood issue to being something that CEO’s regard as the key to maximising performance, says Paul Devoy, CEO, Investors In People.

Devoy adds: "Equally, when the latest corporate scandal hits the press, the root cause can often be traced back to something being fundamentally wrong with the culture. In my view one of the most important aspects of culture is trust. There is an old Dutch saying attributed to Johan Thorbecke who was an influential Dutch politician from the 19th century - “Trust arrives on foot and leaves on horseback”. I believe the fundamental building blocks of an organisation, and any relationship for that matter, centres greatly around trust. This is equally as important for employers and employees, no matter how or where they work."

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