The balance of age in the workplace is key - here's why and how to manage it

And many still do look to that 'golden carriage clock' moment. But for others, the idea of retiring is simply not on the radar, or perhaps a financial option. Recruiters, take note...
HR Grapevine
HR Grapevine | Executive Grapevine International Ltd
The balance of age in the workplace is key - here's why and how to manage it

Retirement used to be a holy grail at the end of a career. And many still do look to that 'golden carriage clock' moment. But for others, the idea of retiring is simply not on the radar, or perhaps a financial option. Recruiters, take note.

A flight attendant with EasyJet has spoken about her experience of still working at 73 - after 20 years with the company. Pam Clark, known as 'Nana Pam', also changed career, from a previous one in hairdressing, and told news outlets: "I'm meeting more and more colleagues like me who have made a brave career change later in life."

Pam is not the norm, though. For many of retirement age and beyond, the idea of applying for a new role, promotion or career shift probably feels too challenging. Not least because of perceived ageism. The government's attempts to draw retirees back to help the UK workforce was met with mixed reviews (to put it politely - some spoke of them being 'forced' back into work). A 'midlife MOT' was suggested, to asses older workers' ability to return to the workplace.

On the flipside, many in their 50s and beyond want to work, and don't want to be left on the 'retiring soon' shelf.

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