Workers bring kids to work to protest endless summer

Workers bring kids to work to protest endless summer

Workers in Israel have bought their kids to work to protest the long summer holidays – Haaretz reports.

The ‘Day of Rage’ was organised by members of a Facebook group called ‘Parents Fighting for Concurrent Vacation with the Children’. The idea was a result of disgruntled parents whose annual leave does not align with the amount of time off their children get.

A similar problem blights the UK too.  

Almost a third of parents struggle to find childcare over the summer holidays (29%) and over a quarter are forced to take unpaid leave to look after their children - a survey by OnePoll, on behalf of Cotton Traders, found.

36% find it difficult to get time off work in the summer to spend time with family, and 29% admit to dreading the summer holidays due to the stress of sourcing childcare.

Nick Hamblin, Managing Director at Cotton Traders, spoke to HR Grapevine about the findings: “Summer brings with it a chance to make memories with friends and family.

“However, our survey found that over one in three parents struggle to balance work and childcare over the summer break; due to the number of holidays that schools have parents can’t keep up.

"We found that 50% of parents believe that having a more flexible workplace would help ease the strain of child care. Employers can be more flexible through letting parents choose their own hours or offer holiday purchase schemes.”

The Haaretz article details the problems that occur when children are in the workplace; chocolate milk and/or glue in the keyboard, kids who are yet to form words answering the phone, and one child wrestling with the boss’ son.

One member of staff also sent his child to ask for a raise. He returned with a handful of candy.

However, according the author of the Haaretz article, the day was not the success that was anticipated. A quick straw poll he conducted of one major media company, one big bank and two start-ups found that these workplaces were not really overrun with children. 

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Comments (3)

  • Sir
    Sir@ Boris
    Wed, 31 Aug 2016 2:27pm BST
    Actually Boris, given the high levels of stress in modern jobs, I think that having a few guinea pigs/rabbits etc around the place to stroke from time to time could have a really calming effect. Certainly Great Ormond Street do this on the wards to help the children cope/recover and it seems to work rather well.
    Not sure this would work for Dobermans, Llamas, Burmese pythons or Shetland ponies though ! (this list is not exhaustive)
  • Sir
    Sir
    Wed, 31 Aug 2016 12:51pm BST
    "We found that 50% of parents believe that having a more flexible workplace would help ease the strain of child care. Employers can be more flexible through letting parents choose their own hours or offer holiday purchase schemes.” Really ?
    I called for an ambulance the other day as my elderly mother had taken a serious fall - they said I'd have to wait at least 2 hours as it was school holidays and most of the crews were on annual leave to cope with childcare.
    Doesn't sound so clever now, does it ?
    Repeat for any emergency services, train drivers, power generation workers, plumbers, postal workers, flight crew. Or does this only apply to office "jobs" where no-one really cares if they are done or not ?
  • Boris
    Boris
    Wed, 31 Aug 2016 12:25pm BST
    If you have kids you should take holiday's into account. Bringing children into the workplace shouldn't be allowed, it's distracting and disruptive for every other worker. A member of staff in our office keeps bringing her child into work and expects everyone else to entertain him. Since I really don't like kids it's intensely irritating and, while i appreciate childcare costs money, if you insist on having children you should plan for these sorts of eventualities. I'm not allowed to bring pets into my office, so why are children allowed?

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